New Yorker: Fiction

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A monthly reading and conversation with the New Yorker fiction editor Deborah Treisman.

Nathan Englander reads Isaac Bashevis Singer – listen to a podcast/subscribe

Deborah Treisman joined The New Yorker’s fiction department at 27, serving as deputy fiction editor from 1997 to 2002, and becoming the fiction editor in 2003. Prior to her time at The New Yorker, Treisman was a member of the editorial staffs of Grand Street, The New York Review of Books, Harper’s, and The Threepenny Review.

Isaac Bashevis Singer (Yiddish: יצחק באַשעװיס זינגער) (November 21, 1902 (see notes below) – July 24, 1991) was a Polish-born JewishAmerican author noted for his short stories. He was one of the leading figures in the Yiddish literary movement, and received the Nobel Prize in literature in 1978.

Nathan Englander is a Jewish-American author born in Long Island, NY in 1970. He wrote the short story collection, For the Relief of Unbearable Urges, published by Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., in 1999. The volume won widespread critical acclaim, earning Englander the 2000 PEN/Faulkner Malamud Award and the American Academy of Arts and Letters Sue Kauffman Prize, and established him as an important writer of fiction.

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